BANGLADESH – My haven in the earth

                              আমার সোনার বাংলা, আমি  তোমায় ভালবাসি 

Bangladesh located at Latitude 23º 43′ N , Longitude 90º 22′ E Bangladesh is in both the eastern and northern hemispheres.  It’s positioned on the Indian Subcontinent in south-central Asia, and is bordered by the Bay of Bengal, and the countries of India and Burma (Myanmar).


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Landforms Bangladesh, a nation of rivers, is in essence a large delta comprised of three significant rivers; the Ganges, Brahmaputra and Meghna.

Subsequently, Bangladesh is one of the most flood-prone countries in the world. When the spring snows melt in the Himalayan Mountains and run south to the sea, the rivers often overflow.

Replete with mangrove forests and tropical rain forests, the overall land is mostly flat, with a few hilly areas in the east and southeast.


arrow Coastline 360 miles (580 km)

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(land) 51,703 sq miles (133,910 sq km)

(water) 3,896 sq miles (10,090 sq km)

(TOTAL) 55,599 sq miles (144,000 sq km)

Population 144,319,600

Population Density : 2,790 per Sq. Mile

For many thousands of years a long list of regional empires and European traders fought for control of the water-logged land now called Bangladesh.

Ruled by Britain in the 19th and 20th centuries under undivided India. After getting Independence from British in 1947 Bangladesh became a part of Pakistan in the name of East Pakistan. Bangladesh (formerly called East Pakistan), was formed in 1971 when it officially separated from its union with West Pakistan (now called Pakistan).

As one of the most crowded countries on the planet, much of the lush, low-lying landscape is subject to yearly flooding, and the subsequent devastation of cyclones.

Those natural hazards have adversely affected the nation’s economy and its people, as they often cause great loss of life.

Not on the front-burner of most travelers, reports from those who venture here rave about its natural beauty, the friendly welcome, the capital city of Dhaka, and the easy-going beach resort of Cox’s Bazar – home to the world’s longest beach.

Landforms Bangladesh, a nation of rivers, is in essence a large delta comprised of three significant rivers; the Ganges, Brahmaputra and Meghna.

Subsequently, Bangladesh is one of the most flood-prone countries in the world. When the spring snows melt in the Himalayan Mountains and run south to the sea, the rivers often overflow.

Replete with mangrove forests and tropical rain forests, the overall land is mostly flat, with a few hilly areas in the east and southeast.
Climate Bangladesh, one of the wettest places on the planet, is hot and rainy in the summer months.

Most of the rain (often over 60 inches per year), falls during the monsoon season (June – September). In contrast, very little rain falls in the cooler months (November – February).

March, April and May are the warmest months with high temps near 90º f. Winter lows seldom fall below 55º f.

As an emerging tourism destination Bangladesh offers travelers many interesting diversions including archaeological sites, historic mosques and monuments, white sandy beaches, and lush forest venues filled with wildlife and waterfalls

Major points-of-interest include Cox’s Bazar, home to the longest beach on the planet; the world’s largest mangrove forest; Ramu village, Sonadia Island, famous for its wide variety of seashells; the gorgeous beaches on St. Martins Island, the Aggameda Khyang sanctuary and monastery and its bronze Buddha images; Royal Bengal Tigers tours, and of course, the capital city of Dhaka, filled with the symbols of its rich Muslim history.

 

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